A brand new photography festival launches in Bristol in 2021 in collaboration with all major arts venues in Bristol. The “Growing Spaces” project strand of the festival looks at the maze of citywide allotments, allotment holders, their histories and stories – both visual and oral. Hear from the Festival Director of Engagement and Education, Alejandro Acín, about how you can get involved in the public participatory element to the Growing Spaces project.

The Children’s Kitchen, a Feeding Bristol project working with partners 91 Ways and Square Food Foundation, have produced a series of recipes and cookery videos to inspire children to cook at home. The videos feature Bristol cooks and their children from 91 Ways, Square Food Foundation and KnowleDGE. There is also a costed shopping list for buying ingredients on the £15 budget and links to useful websites and support around food.

Lisa Furness from The People’s Republic of Stokes Croft introduces the new community café from the Stokes Croft Food Project. Thanks to the generosity of the people who have supported their ongoing crowdfunding campaign as well as help from the Bristol Food Union, the project is delighted to announce the opening of the new “Pay What You Can” café.

This year, Bristol celebrates its 15th year as a Fairtrade City, marking fifteen years of campaigning from individuals, commitment from businesses and support from Bristol City Council. The team behind Bristol Fair Trade Network explain more in our latest blog post.

During the lockdown, Barton Hill Settlement’s The Network partnered with local storyteller, Polly Tisdall, to create a new podcast to celebrate Bristol’s communities. The podcast, Held In Common, shared unexpected positives that people had noticed during the virus outbreak with food very much at the heart of many of the stories. Writer and academic Bernie Munoz participated in the project and contributes to our latest blog post.

Director of The Children’s Kitchen, Jo Ingleby, considers the importance of being able to cook a meal from scratch with simple, fresh, affordable ingredients. The significance of this essential skill has been highlighted during the COVID-19 crisis, as dealing with shortages of certain ingredients is – of course – far less stressful when we know how to easily adapt meals.