Dominic Knight is a Bristol resident and allotment holder. After finding himself with surplus this season he contacted FoodCycle Bristol and begun taking them weekly donations. Realising the potential within his own allotment group he set up a donation shed to allow others to contribute surplus as well. In our latest blog post, Dominic considers the potential for this concept to take hold across the city.

For Bristol’s students, the new academic year is a chance to get to grips with managing student loans and kitchen cupboards. In our latest blog post, interns on The University of Bristol’s Sustainability Team, Emma Lewins and Anya Kaufman, write about cutting food waste for the new cohort of Bristol students. They offer five easy ways to reduce food waste in the student kitchen.

The most recent free webinar in the #BristolFoodKind campaign looked at practical ways to “make the most of our food” such as ways to store and use it. The webinar was organised by Katie Powell and Sarah Hargreaves of Resource Futures, coordinators of the Food Waste area of excellence of Bristol’s Going for Gold. They were joined by Manu Maunganidze as Chair, and panellists Gemma Annan, Reena Anderson-Bickley, and the team from Bristol Junk Food Cafe who shared lots of tips and tricks to prevent food from going to waste.

Our latest blog post shares some of the highlights of the Bristol Food Kind campaign linked to food waste – from reviving carrots in a jar of water, to using up black bananas, to starting a wormery. Using the hashtag #BristolFoodKind, please let other citizens in the city know what you’re doing to ensure that you eat what you buy, and buy what you eat.

#BristolFoodKind is a campaign to create a community of acts of kindness through food during the lockdown. This community is sharing practical ideas for how you can buy food, reduce waste and grow from home, in a way that is considerate to yourself and your community at a time of crisis. Our latest blog post shows some of the best of #BristolFoodKind that has emerged so far in each of our three themes, plus acts of kindness from some of the city’s wonderful community food responders.

Joy Carey, coordinator of Bristol Going for Gold, addresses what a resilient food system could look like for Bristol once we emerge from the COVID-19 crisis. It is ten years since her report ‘Who Feeds Bristol: Towards a resilient food plan’ and this blog post identifies five core principles to start building a better and more resilient food system as soon as we can.

Community Engagement Officer at Bristol Waste Company Gemma Annan shares some of her personal waste-changing achievements and explains the ‘Slim My Waste – Happy Kitchen’ campaign. Being really being aware of what you are buying, using and throwing will help improve yours and the planet’s relationship with food. How about giving banana peel burgers a go!?

Our food system has been brought into sharp focus in the last few weeks. We have seen the vulnerability of our food supply, farmers facing a shortage of workers and food businesses facing an unprecedented economic crisis. The team behind Bristol’s bid to be a Gold Sustainable Food City have launched #BristolFoodKind, to share practical ideas on how to shop, reduce food waste and grow your own in a way that is considerate to yourself and your community.