Bristol’s Get Growing Garden Trail is back after the 2020 event was cancelled – this time for a harvest-themed event. More than 20 fruit and vegetable gardens open their doors to the public. From apple juice-making to garden tours to nature trails – dozens of free family-friendly activities are on offer. Hear from the Bristol Food Network team about what’s planned.

Guy Manchester, Community Gardening Facilitator at Alive Activities, is also an organiser for both Bristol Seed Swap and East Bristol Hops Collective. In this Bristol Bites Back Better blog post he tells the story about how East Bristol Hops was formed.
Get in touch with Guy if you would like to join the association, which has hop plants all ready to go in the ground from this year’s cuttings.

The urban environment is full of edges, between areas, buildings, and also between people. Each edge has its own unique potential for transformation. ‘Veg on the Edge’ @ Dame Emily Park Project is a partnership between Blaise Plant Nursery, The Art of Kindness (Julian Wood) and BS3 Community. Rachel Brown shares the aims of the project – find out how you can get involved.

Alice Lee from Propagation Place at St Werburghs City Farm (SWCF) writes about the fantastic work of this volunteer-led community business. Even with a reduced volunteering programme for 2020, Propagation Place dispatched more than 2000 orders for vegetable plug plants. There are up to 18 people who volunteer at Propagation Place each week, some of whom join independently, and some of whom are referred.

Knowle West Health Association (KWHA)’s Edward Duffield writes the latest Bristol Bites Back Better blog post about the ‘Let’s Grow’ community food growing project, collaboration with Feeding Bristol and how Occupational Therapy students from the University of the West of England have been volunteering early this year. Find out about how this project has adapted during the pandemic.

Stella Smith from the St George Park Community Garden writes our latest blog post about the work of the garden and how the pandemic has encouraged people to get outside and interested in local parks and growing projects. Liz and Andy are two of the main garden volunteers, pictured above. The community garden grows and provides fresh vegetables and fruit for the local community to sample when ready to harvest. Find out how to get involved.

The latest Bristol Bites Back Better blog post is by Caroline Penny describing the work of Tynings Field Community Group. Tynings Field is a community horticultural smallholding initiative on an acre of land in Shirehampton, on a housing estate just off the Severn walkway not far from Horseshoe Bend Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSI). The group welcome volunteers in the field and there are organised work days with groups when it is safe to do so.