When we launched the Bristol Bites Back Better campaign in November, we wanted to get the conversation going and hear from the people of Bristol. We asked two simple questions, and got a wide range of answers so far, giving us insight into what Bristol citizens want to see happening in our city, and who deserves celebration. Insights Manager at cycling charity Love to Ride, Fleur, has compiled some of the responses in our latest blog post. You can still get involved!

Abi Sweet and Guy Manchester from Alive Activities write our latest blog post about a new allotment offering supported gardening and socialising sessions for people living with dementia and their carers. Alive will also be recruiting volunteers to help with the day-to-day running of the project. Allotments are a vital community social hub at the best of times, but they came into their own during the lockdown.

Jo Boswell is the market gardener for The Kitchen Garden Enterprise, part of the Heart of BS13 charity tackling food insecurity and health inequalities in Hartcliffe and Withywood. Jo joined the charity in June 2020 and was formerly a community cook and fermentation teacher before studying permaculture with Shift Bristol and turning her hands to the soil. Jo writes here about her work developing the Kitchen Garden Enterprise at Heart of BS13 with Solveig Harmsworth.

Without having any prior gardening experience, café-owners Faruk and Shilpi Choudhury of Chai Shai Kitchen started an edible garden in the grounds of their flat at Carrick House, Hotwells in the lockdown of spring 2020. This encouraged others in the local community to get involved and “Joy Hill” was formed. Read this inspiring story in our latest #BiteBackBetter blog post by Faruk.

In our latest blog post, originally published in the Soil Association’s Organic Farming magazine, Ped Asgarian, the new director of Feeding Bristol takes an honest look at diversity in British farming. Feeding Bristol is the lead on the Food Equality action area of Bristol’s Going for Gold Sustainable Food Places bid.

Dominic Knight is a Bristol resident and allotment holder. After finding himself with surplus this season he contacted FoodCycle Bristol and begun taking them weekly donations. Realising the potential within his own allotment group he set up a donation shed to allow others to contribute surplus as well. In our latest blog post, Dominic considers the potential for this concept to take hold across the city.

Kim Brooks, Managing Director at The Community Farm, shares why she is celebrating ‘Organic September’ this year, as she does every year! Buying organically-certified fruit and veg gives you peace of mind that crops have been grown to an agreed set of standards based around health, ecology, fairness and care for current and future generations.

The new Bristol Photo Festival (BPF) has commissioned photographer Chris Hoare to document allotments and their communities around the city. Chris is also a food delivery driver, so he was able to access the whole city throughout lockdown and reflect on wider issues of the supply of Bristol’s food. Find out how you can get involved in the Growing Spaces project.