“Food Justice is about creating a food system that is fair for everyone. It is about recognising the systemic and institutional inequity that exists in how we grow, distribute, access and use food.” We hear from Feeding Bristol’s Ped Asgarian about Bristol’s Food Justice Week. (This event has now been postponed.)

For 10 years, the Food Policy Council (FPC) has been striving to put ‘Good Food’ onto the agenda in Bristol, and to keep it there. Now, in the wake of the success of the city’s ‘Going for Gold’ campaign, the FPC is passing on the baton. In this blog, we celebrate a decade of the FPC, thank all those who contributed to its success and look forward, considering how its work will continue across the city.

In our latest Bristol Bites Back Better blog we hear from Heart of BS13’s Food Security Programme Lead, Jodie Smith, about the work the organisation is doing in Hartcliffe and Withywood. Mobilising adults, young people and children to improve life outcomes, Heart of BS13 address food hardship, improves physical and mental health and takes action to tackle the climate and biodiversity crisis.

We hear from Ped Asgarian from Feeding Bristol in the latest Bristol Bites Back Better blog about the One City Food Equality Strategy, which is now open to public consultation. The draft strategy sets out five priorities (fair equitable access; choice; skills and resources; a sustainable local food system; and food at the heart of decision-making) and a set of strategic aims. Read on to find out how to share your views and opinions now.

In the final blog in our series about a post COVID-19 sustainable food future, Bristol public health medic Dr Angela Raffle explores how we find ways to help everyone in the city understand where our food comes from. How do we radically shift our collective awareness about food? This is part of a series of blog posts looking at how we can emerge from the coronavirus pandemic with a more resilient food system, each blog introduced by Bristol Going for Gold Coordinator, Joy Carey.

Director of The Children’s Kitchen, Jo Ingleby, considers the importance of being able to cook a meal from scratch with simple, fresh, affordable ingredients. The significance of this essential skill has been highlighted during the COVID-19 crisis, as dealing with shortages of certain ingredients is – of course – far less stressful when we know how to easily adapt meals.