In March, Bristol City Council became the first council outside of London to introduce an end to advertising junk food. Nicola Round from volunteer group Adblock Bristol shares her vision for a city where public spaces are free from corporate advertising altogether.
In this opinion piece, she asks us to imagine a future where advertisers no longer have the right to use our public spaces to tell us to consume, consume, consume.

The latest Bristol Bites Back Better blog post is by Caroline Penny describing the work of Tynings Field Community Group. Tynings Field is a community horticultural smallholding initiative on an acre of land in Shirehampton, on a housing estate just off the Severn walkway not far from Horseshoe Bend Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSI). The group welcome volunteers in the field and there are organised work days with groups when it is safe to do so.

In our latest blog post, Bristol food waste chef and educator Shane Jordan shares his thoughts about helping Bristol residents reduce their food waste, encouraging awareness around buying, storing and recycling food. Supporting Bristol’s local economy and trying to buy fresh locally produced food is also incredibly important for Shane.

In the final blog in our series about a post COVID-19 sustainable food future, Bristol public health medic Dr Angela Raffle explores how we find ways to help everyone in the city understand where our food comes from. How do we radically shift our collective awareness about food? This is part of a series of blog posts looking at how we can emerge from the coronavirus pandemic with a more resilient food system, each blog introduced by Bristol Going for Gold Coordinator, Joy Carey.

In our latest blog post, originally published in the Soil Association’s Organic Farming magazine, Ped Asgarian, the new director of Feeding Bristol takes an honest look at diversity in British farming. Feeding Bristol is the lead on the Food Equality action area of Bristol’s Going for Gold Sustainable Food Places bid.