The latest Bristol Bites Back Better blog post is by Caroline Penny describing the work of Tynings Field Community Group. Tynings Field is a community horticultural smallholding initiative on an acre of land in Shirehampton, on a housing estate just off the Severn walkway not far from Horseshoe Bend Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSI). The group welcome volunteers in the field and there are organised work days with groups when it is safe to do so.

In the summer of 2020, five Bristol businesses came together to develop Breaking Bread – a pop-up tipi village of socially distanced dining and drinking venues on Clifton Downs. As a response to the coronavirus pandemic and its devastating effects on the events and hospitality industries, Pauline Bourdon, Breaking Bread’s sustainability and social cohesion coordinator explains how they joined forces to build a socially responsible and sustainable enterprise.

When we launched the Bristol Bites Back Better campaign in November, we wanted to get the conversation going and hear from the people of Bristol. We asked two simple questions, and got a wide range of answers so far, giving us insight into what Bristol citizens want to see happening in our city, and who deserves celebration. Insights Manager at cycling charity Love to Ride, Fleur, has compiled some of the responses in our latest blog post. You can still get involved!

Nick Haigh, Coordinator of Bristol Gleaning Network, shares some of the work the network is doing to glean surplus fruit and vegetables from farms in and around Bristol – gleaning is an activity where volunteers harvest human edible surplus from farms. Nick is looking to connect with local food projects who can benefit from the redistribution of this food, as well as from producers and potential volunteers.

Abi Sweet and Guy Manchester from Alive Activities write our latest blog post about a new allotment offering supported gardening and socialising sessions for people living with dementia and their carers. Alive will also be recruiting volunteers to help with the day-to-day running of the project. Allotments are a vital community social hub at the best of times, but they came into their own during the lockdown.

In our latest blog Sustainability and Behaviour Change Consultant Livvy Drake unpacks the psychological factors at work in how undertaking a challenge such as Veganuary, Fish-free February or Plastic-free Lent can achieve long-term behaviour change. Livvy runs behaviour change workshops for environmental campaigners and communicators who want to have a greater reach with their campaigns.

Both the University of Bristol and the University of the West of England (UWE) have committed to positive actions to improve the sustainability of food within their institutions, with pledges including creating a Sustainable Food Plan for 2021 and designating food courts to being single-use free. Find out more about the exciting work the universities are doing on food.